Tagged: CCDOC Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Linda Shelton 11:20 pm on July 19, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CCDOC, , discharge, processing out, release policy, release procedure, release process,   

    Bond and Release process or release procedure from Cook County Jail 


    After the detainee is scheduled for release by the court he must go through a discharge procedure. He/she will not be able to tell you a time to pick him/her up and the jail won’t be able to tell you a time either.

    Make sure to also read the official Cook County Jail web site’s bonding page: http://www.cookcountysheriff.org/doc/doc_Bonding.html

    If he/she is in court in the morning, then they will be returned to their unit in the jail by about noon to 3 pm. If they are being released then they will be given their clothing and told  to dress and put their bedding into the linen bags.

    They will be escorted to the discharge area where they will have to wait anywhere from 1 to 8 hrs for release. They will have paperwork filled out and they will be identified multiple times to make sure they are releasing the right person. If on bond they have to sign and receive bond papers.  If they are  on any medications, then this will prolong the process as the doctor has to write the orders, the pharmacy has to fill them, and the detainee must be escorted to the pharmacy to pick them up.

    If they are to be electronically monitored, then more time is needed to  be processed for this.

    The process begins around 8 am if the detainee has finished a sentence and is scheduled for release on a specific day.

    Nothing is done during shift changes and for an hour before and after. That is between 6 am and 8 am and 2 pm and 4 pm. Shift changes are at 7 am, 3 pm and 11 pm.

    A person can be released any time of the day or night and on weekends and holidays also, if bond is paid or there is a court order.

    When processing is complete they will be released out of Division 5 – the big white gate a 1/2 block south of 26th street on California avenue.  There is NO PLACE to wait for the detainee, even if they are ill, disabled in a wheelchair or it is storming or snowing. People picking them up have to wait on the sidewalk or in their cars.

    The inmate will not be able to call you because their cell phone battery will be dead by the time they are released. They receive their money as a check and therefore they have no change to make a  phone call.

    They are only given a bus pass, along with any property the jail staff have not conveniently “misplaced”, along with a check for their money that was placed in the commissary if released before 5 pm. If released at night or evening, then they have to come back to the jail during business hours to pick up their check.

    Bond money will be mailed as a check to their last known address six to eight weeks after their trial is over with or the charges are dismissed. The clerk keeps 10 % of the bond as a processing fee, no matter how large the bond. ($10 for a $100 bond;  $1000 for a $10,000 bond)

    You will not be able to call the jail and find out when they will be released. They will not answer that question.

    So if they were scheduled for release that day – expect the detainee to emerge between around 9 am and noon.

    If they are being released after a court hearing, expect them to be released around 4 to 8 pm, rarely between noon and 2 pm.

    If they are released after bail is posted expect to have to wait from 2-6 hrs before they emerge (not counting shift change time [7 am, 3 pm, 11 pm] and the hour before and after shift change).

     
    • WHITNEY 3:44 pm on September 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      THANKS! VERY HELPFUL INFO!

      • Linda Shelton 4:30 pm on September 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Your welcome – it makes what I do for the public worthwhile!

    • Mary 9:54 pm on November 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Does cook county still hold illegal immigrants that are detained for ICE?

      • Linda Shelton 10:33 pm on November 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        I don’t know if they have a contract, but I do know that some illegal immigrants who are in jail pretrial because they can’t pay a bond have a “hold” on them by the immigration service as an illegal immigrant or an illegal immigrant with a criminal history so when and if they are found innocent or released, they will be taken into custody for ICE and will be deported.

        • Viviana 11:58 am on February 15, 2013 Permalink

          In September 2011, the County passed a new law that prohibits the Sheriff from holding people pursuant to adminstrative requests by ICE because these requests are not based on probable cause and often result in unlawful detention – so if they are eligible for release they will be released. They will NOT be released if a judge believes they pose a flight risk or public safety threat, and they will NOT be released if there is a outstanding criminal warrant for their arrest. See, http://www.jesusgarciaforcookcounty.com/p/in-news.html

    • Maggie 7:33 pm on December 6, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      You seem very knowledgeable and I am very lost right now, my boyfriend got sentenced to 365 days ( for a misdemeanor driving on revoked!!!!!!!) we were not expecting this at all, is there a place where I can look up his release date?

      • Linda Shelton 12:34 am on December 16, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        You can look it up at the Illinois Department of Correction web site when you search under “inmate search”. His release date is calculated by taking the sentencing date, going back on the calender the number of days he got credit for serving at cook county jail and then adding 180 days (1/2 year as he gets automatic day for day good time credit, which can be revoked if he acts up in prison).

      • Linda Shelton 11:52 am on December 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Take his sentencing date and add 182 days (he automatically gets day for day good time credits so he will do six monts), then subtract the number of days credit he was given by the judge for the days he was in jail after being arrested. This will get you his out date.

    • Toni Anthony 9:24 pm on January 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Will the Wait After Paying a D Bond Be Possilbly Over Night?

      • Linda Shelton 7:01 pm on January 22, 2013 Permalink | Reply

        No – he should be released before then. If you paid it at 5-9 pm however, he may not get out until 1 am.

    • Reemonda 8:49 pm on February 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      What does no bond means?

      • Linda Shelton 2:21 pm on April 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        No bond meands you stay in jail until trial or until the judge changes the order at a future hearing. You can’t get out by paying a bond.

    • Jasmine 4:05 pm on March 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Also the fact that I have a friend that also was in jail and bailed out by his friend he said the check went to him and not the person who bonded him out is the true? My x husband owes child support can I go after the bond money ??

      • Linda Shelton 2:18 pm on April 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        The money is mailed to the inmate at his last known address. Of course you can go after the bond money. You would need a court order and help from an attorney to put a lien on it.

    • Fahima McGee 12:29 pm on April 4, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      My husband was sentenced on March 12, caught on outstanding warrant. Left to DOC that Thursday. Signed off on bond slip 3/12. Why haven’t I received my bond back it’s been 21 days.

      • Linda Shelton 2:11 pm on April 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        It can take up to 8 weeks to receive bond back minus 10 %. The check is sent to the inmate at his last known address registered with the jail when he was picked up.

    • larry 1:44 pm on April 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      What determines the type of bond issued? Specificly, why would someone be given a c-bond rather than a d-bond? Thank you

      • Linda Shelton 2:26 pm on April 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        If a judge is really nasty or a person very rich and they want to kep them in jail and then steal their money as Illinois has an unconstitutional statute that the court keeps 10% of all bond money returned, even if the person is innocent! We need a class action about this taking of property (money) through fraud without due process of law. The court clerk is essentially charging different fees from defendants for the same service, tying the fee to the amount of bail. This is unconstitutional and amounts to felony fraud.

  • Linda Shelton 5:08 am on July 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CCDOC, , , handicapped parking, parking, parking meters, pay boxes   

    Parking at cook county jail 


    The jail has street parking only on california and on 26th street. On California you will be ticketed or towed between 4-6 pm so don’t park at that time. There is plenty of parking on the streets behind and to the side of the large parking lot on the east side of California and 26th St.

    You must pay for street parking about $2.00 per hour using quarters or a credit card.  The pay boxes are located at intervals around the block and you must put a receipt in your window or you will get a ticket.  There are no individual parking spaces and parking meters have all been removed.

    Don’t get confused that there are no parking meters.  You still have to pay for parking at the pay boxes and put the receipt into your car window.

    A company was contracted with to provide and maintain the pay boxes and the City got ripped off in the deal (they received millions up front, but far less than the total contract over decades is worth).

    Handicapped parking is not available. You must park on the streets. Yes it is illegal for the city to fail to provide handicapped parking spaces near the jail, but the City of Chicago and the Cook County Courts hold themselves above the law and IL Attorney General Lisa Madigan, whose job it is to enforce federal laws pertaining to handicapped persons parking and accommodations has refused to enforce the law.

    Only prosecutors, prosecution witnesses, people undergoing exam in the forensic psychiatry clinic on the 10th floor of the court services building, and employees can park in the parking garage or use the handicapped spaces in the parking garage.

    The parking garage is not big enough to accommodate all persons who come to the jail and courthouse.

    Defense witnesses, defense attorneys, and family members or people viewing trials from the gallery must  park on the street or in the private expensive parking lot on the NW corner of 26th & California.

     
    • Sharon Baker-Johnson 1:57 pm on December 1, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      As of 12/1/12, parking on the street is now $1.75 an hr., max. 4 hrs. People checking for expired receipts on the car windshields are diligent.

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 709 other followers